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Missionary Mormon Ads

Summary: Below you will find all of the MormonAds from the New Era magazine related to missionary work. To download them, click on the thumbnail to open the full-sized image, then right click and select save.

Acceptance Letter

Woman Writing a LetterReading your mission call letter that your receive from the prophet assigning you to your field of labor is always nerve raking and exciting. Most people will pause, celebrate, cry, or all of the above after reading the line that says “you are assigned to labor in the ________ mission.”

When you read to the end of the letter, though, you will notice that the prophet asks you to “please send your written acceptance promptly.” I’m not aware of any specific deadline for writing this letter. I assume promptly means within days or a week at most. I also presume if you don’t send that acceptance letter within a couple of weeks, you or your stake president will be getting a call from the Church’s Missionary Department.

When I received my mission call, way back  in the 1990s, acceptance letters were sent through the mail (snail mail, that is). Nowadays, acceptance letters are sent through the same missionary online recommendation system you used to send in your original application. You’ll log in and sending in your acceptance letter will be as easy as sending an email.

Now, with regard to what should be included in your acceptance letter, Elder David B. Haight, formerly of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, once spoke about the mission call acceptance letter. You may want to read his words as you consider what to say in your letter.

Included in the packet is a page that may go unnoticed at first. It is a form, the Missionary Call Acceptance. This is a personal letter in which the missionary, addressing the First Presidency, formally accepts his or her missionary call. The form contains 15 lines on which the missionary expresses feelings about the singular opportunity of serving the Lord. The letters are usually handwritten, brief, and direct. Yet these few words speak volumes and convey deep meaning. Behind each one is a faith-promoting story.

“My Savior has blessed me more than I ever imagined. He gave His life for me. The least I can do is give Him two years of my life.”

…In accepting a call to serve, the missionary is expressing sufficient faith to act on his or her beliefs. Blessings will inevitably follow, as so many returned missionaries can testify. Faith in the Savior becomes an anchor to the soul.

“I can’t express the happiness and joy I feel as I accept this call to serve. I am ready and willing to commit two years of my life to preaching the gospel.”

In the acceptance letter, many missionaries state, “I gratefully accept my call to serve.” But I wonder how many missionaries realize the implications of the word accept. It means to receive willingly something given or offered; to respond favorably to; consider right and proper. It also means to be admitted into a group or community. In a gospel sense, it implies submission to the will of the Lord and willingness to follow the prophet, who extends the call. The mission “call” is to serve the Lord with all one’s heart, might, mind, and strength. The mission “assignment” is to serve in the assigned field of labor. The acceptance letter implies willingness to accept both the call and the assignment as the Lord’s will.

“Preparing for my mission has been a long struggle. After deciding to serve a mission, it took almost one and one-half years to overcome problems in my conduct.”

…“Deciding to go on a mission wasn’t easy. Having a strong passion for the game of baseball made it hard.”

Numerous acceptance letters speak of sacrifice. The young man quoted above was well on his way to fulfilling a life-long dream to play baseball in college, and then perhaps enjoy a career in professional baseball. After ponderous and prayerful thought, however, the answer was certain: he was to serve the Lord. Once the decision was made, his priorities in life became clear.

…Prospective missionaries write about giving up a prized car, a girlfriend, music, a lucrative job, and many other things. Too many allow such worldly treasures to blind them to spiritual opportunity and divert them from their foreordained mission. On the other hand, we are continually amazed and gratified by those who forsake all to serve the Lord.

“Just two short years ago, I did not have any purpose in life. When I walked the streets, I was scared that people would ask, ‘How are you?’ Finally, two missionaries helped me find the love of Christ. I will find people who have the same feelings I had and show them the purpose of life.”

Mormon wrote, “Perfect love casteth out all fear” (Moro. 8:16). When prospective missionaries learn of life’s purpose and of the Lord’s love, they gain the courage to act in spite of fears. In doing so, they learn the fears were an illusion, a creation of their minds. The Lord repeatedly assures missionaries that He will give them strength to succeed in the face of obstacles. “He that trembleth under my power shall be made strong, and shall bring forth fruits of praise and wisdom” (D&C 52:17). President Harold B. Lee often stated, “Whom the Lord calls, the Lord qualifies.”

…Missionary Call Acceptance letters reveal a wealth of spirituality and faith. My own faith is continually strengthened by those who accept calls to serve God, who allow their love for the Lord to overshadow their fears, and who submit willingly to the call of our living prophet. I pray always that every eligible young man, and also every young woman who so desires, may experience the wondrous adventure of a mission.

A Spiritual Adventure, David B. Haight, New Era, June 2000.

What is a Mormon Mission?

What is a Mormon mission? On the surface that may seem like a silly question because most of the audience knows exactly what it is already. But I believe, for the benefit of future missionaries as well as for non-Mormon friends that come to this site, it is worth discussing.

A mission, whether religious in nature or not, is defined as “a specific task with which a person or a group is charged.” A religious mission is “a ministry commissioned by a religious organization to propagate its faith.”  Consistent with these definitions from Webster, a Mormon mission is when members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the official name of the Mormon Church) are given the task to actively share their faith with others.mormon missionaries talking to man in street

Varieties of a Mormon Mission

Proselytizing Missions: Nearly all Mormon missionaries serve proselytizing missions in which they devote the majority of their time to teaching the gospel of Jesus Christ to those unfamiliar with our faith. All missionaries also spend time in community and personal service to others.  The Church even recently announced missionaries will be using Facebook in their work to meet and teach people. Missionaries teach the fundamentals of the gospel of Jesus Christ:

  • that God is our Heavenly Father, He loves us and has a plan for our eternal happiness.
  • that Jesus Christ is our Savior and only by following his teachings can we receive salvation.
  • that Joseph Smith was a prophet and the Lord’s instrument in restoring the gospel of Jesus Christ after a long period of apostasy.
  • that repentance and baptism are the gateway to eternal life.
  • that through prayer and the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, God guides each of us.

Young Men:  At age 18, young Mormon men are asked to leave their homes for two years and dedicate their lives to missionary service.  Former Church President Spencer W. Kimball was asked a few years ago, “Should every young man who is a member of the Church fill a mission?” He responded with this answer: “Yes, every worthy young man should fill a mission. The Lord expects it of him. And if he is not now worthy to fill a mission, then he should start at once to qualify himself.” (From “President Kimball Speaks Out on Being a Missionary,” New Era, May 1981) Every Church president since then has reiterated that call for all young men to serve a full-time mission.

Young Women: Young Mormon women, called sister missionaries, can go on a one and a half year mission when they turn 19 years old.  Former Church President Gordon B. Hinckley has said, regarding  young sister missionaries, “They perform a remarkable work. They can get in homes where the elders [male missionaries] cannot. But it should be kept in mind that young sisters are not under obligation to go on missions. They should not feel that they have a duty comparable to that of young men, but some will wish to go. If so, they should counsel with their bishop as well as their parents.”  (From “To the Bishops of the Church,” Worldwide Leadership Training Meeting, June 2004)

Senior Couples: When married couples are no longer in  the full-time work force, they are encouraged to go on a proselytizing missions, humanitarian missions, and other types of missions.  Elder Robert D. Hales of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles has said this of senior missionaries: “I feel a deep responsibility to speak to you today about a pressing need in the Church. My greatest hope is that as I speak, the Holy Ghost will touch hearts, and somewhere a spouse or two will quietly nudge his or her companion, and a moment of truth will occur. I will speak on the urgent need for more mature couples to serve in the mission field.”  (From Robert D. Hales, “Couple Missionaries: A Time to Serve,” Ensign, May 2001)

church service missionariesChurch Service Missions, Temple Missions, and Others: The types of missions mentioned above are the most common, but there are a wide variety of other types of missions available for older single women, for young people who for health reasons can’t serve a full-time mission, and for others.  “For those [youth honorably excused from full-time missionary labors] . . . , bishops may . . . identify appropriate local opportunities for Church or community service for a specified period of time (usually 6 to 24 months).” (From First Presidency letter, Jan. 30, 2004). See my article for more information on Church Service Missions.

Special Missionary Preparation Issue of New Era

MissionPreparationIssueNewEraI’ve added the March 2007 New Era to the mission prep recommended reading list. This was a special Missionary Preparation Issue of the New Era magazine. It is full of great articles for youth preparing for missions.  Here is a full list of the articles in this special edition:

  • Gifts to Bring Home from the Mission Field by President Gordon B. Hinckley
  • Line upon Line: D&C 4
  • How to Prepare to Be a Good Missionary by Elder M. Russell Ballard
  • From Friends to Sisters to Companions by Rebecca Mills Hume and Brad Wilcox
  • Your Call to Serve by David A. Edwards
  • I Took the Temple with Me by Cory Keate
  • Inspired to Bless by Eric J. Greenhalgh
  • Q&A: Questions and Answers New Era Poster 
  • Inside the MTC by Danielle Nye Poulter
  • “We’ve Got to Find Her” Elder Bruce C. Hafen
  • Idea List: Fit to Serve
  • A Day in the Life of a Missionary by Adam C. Olson
  • The Five M’s of Missionary Work by President Thomas S. Monson
  • Me? A Sister Missionary? by Taryn Salmon
  • Determined to Serve by Richard M. Romney
  • To the Point
  • If I Had Known at 19 … by Roger Terry
  • The Extra Smile
  • Missionary Mail Connie Myers
  • Instant Messages
  • What’s Up?
  • Poem: To J.E.H. and Many Others Peter B. Ball

Note: The New Era is an official monthly publication for youth of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.